Research projects

The Institute for Chemical Immunology has many research projects in which chemically and immunologically trained PhD students and postdocs collaborate and which cover a wide variety of topics in chemical immunology. Below is an overview of all current research projects and the scientists involved:

Project Title Researchers
ICI00001 Exploring crosstalk between CLRs and TLRs using single molecule vaccines Eveline Li
Tim Hogervorst
ICI00002 Mechanisms of action of Ubiquitin-like modifier ISG15 in immune regulation Jolien Luimstra
Victoria Iglesias Guimarais
ICI00003 Dissection of the cancer MHC ligandome Anita Jeko
Kaspar Bresser
ICI00004 Development of next generation antibody-drug conjugates Jorick Bruins
Lina Bartels
ICI00005 Understanding and modulating anthracyclin-induced immunogenic death Sabina van der Zanden
Dennis Wander
ICI00006

Polymer based synthetic dendritic cells

Dion Voerman
Jorieke Weiden
ICI00007 Organization of molecular complexes in immune cells Sjoerd van Deventer
Viviana Neviani
ICI00011

Turning tumor glycans into anticancer vaccines

Sophie Dusoswa
Tomislav Čaval
ICI00012 Novel approaches to study the effects of hypoxic ROS in Systemic sclerosis etiology Laurent Paardekooper
Andrea Ottria
ICI00013

Multipurpose Pluribodies

Angela Elhebieshy 
Elko Peterse
ICI00014 Exploiting T cell metabolism as a target for therapeutic intervention Sander de Kivit
Anna Hoekstra
ICI00015

Visualization of vitamin A metabolism

Martje Erkelens
Sebastiaan Koenders
ICI00016 Specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators: sources and targets in acute and chronic inflammation Joost von Hegedus
Berend Gagestein
ICI00017 In vivo tracking of T cell epitopes from synthetic tumor vaccines Alexi Sarris
Brett Hos
ICI00018 Visualizing macromolecular complexes in MHC antigen presentation Laurel Schunselaar 
Jonas Dörr
ICI00019 Trojan horses for antigen-specific B cell targeting in RA Hendy Kristyanto
Lianne Lelieveldt
- Polyisocyanopeptide nanoworms as artificial antigen-presenting cells: towards efficient cancer immunotherapy

Loek Eggermont